No
Yes
View More
View Less
Working...
Close
OK
Cancel
Confirm
System Message
Delete
Schedule
An unknown error has occurred and your request could not be completed. Please contact support.
Scheduled
Wait Listed
Personal Calendar
Speaking
Conference Event
Meeting
Interest
Schedule TBD
Conflict Found
This session is already scheduled at another time. Would you like to...
Loading...
Please enter a maximum of {0} characters.
Please enter a maximum of {0} words.
must be 50 characters or less.
must be 40 characters or less.
Session Summary
We were unable to load the map image.
This has not yet been assigned to a map.
Search Catalog
Reply
Replies ()
Search
New Post
Microblog
Microblog Thread
Post Reply
Post
Your session timed out.
This web page is not optimized for viewing on a mobile device. Visit this site in a desktop browser to access the full set of features.
2017 GTC San Jose

S7293 - Detecting Topological Changes in Dynamic Delaunay Triangulations Using CUDA

Session Speakers
Session Description

Learn how to detect topological changes that occur in dynamic 2D Delaunay triangulations using CUDA. We'll present a novel, unified approach that can be applied in all those cases (pedestrian tracking, flocking, moving bubbles, etc.) where objects are triangulated starting from a density map. Topological changes are detected comparing two subsequent triangulations and they show up as "flipped-edges." We'll show new physics results due to the unprecedented statistics of detection of irreversible topological changes, occurring in the triangulation of the droplets of a Lattice Boltzmann emulsion, allowed by our implementation. Such changes are associated to the so-called plastic events that are responsible for the complex behavior of emulsions possessing both liquid and solid features at the same time. In our implementation, we used a suitable mix of in-house developed CUDA kernels and primitives from existing CUDA libraries.


Additional Session Information
Intermediate
Talk
Algorithms Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Physics Computer Aided Engineering
25 minutes
Session Schedule